Filed Under:  Mexico

WATCH: Social Experiment with Mexican Kids Shows Institutionalized Racism

December 22nd 2011   ·   0 Comments

Remember the famous experiment involving children and baby dolls?

Conducted by Kenneth and Mamie Clark during the 1940s, the social experiment asked a sampling of black and white children about two identical dolls, one with white skin and blonde hair and the other with brown skin and black hair. The children were asked which doll was good, and which was bad. Which was pretty, and which was ugly? You get the deal. The experiment studied children’s ideas about race at the time.

Fast forward several decades, and a similar experiment involving Mexican children may be a signal that not much has changed since the Clarks’ study. We included a video culled from the study below, so you can form your own opinion.

Here’s a little background first: As part of a campaign titled “Racism in Mexico,” the organization 11.11 Cambio Social sat Mexican children in front of two dolls and asked them which they felt is good and bad.

“Why is the white doll good?” a woman facilitating the experiment asked one boy after he pointed at the white doll.

“Because his eyes are blue and whole body is white,” the boy answered.

Check out the video below and tell us what you think:

A version of this column originally appeared in www.latina.com.

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